Re: beginner question

John Person
 

Thanks for sharing, Paul

See you tonight.

Jack Person

-----Original Message-----
From: AARC-PUBLIC@groups.io <AARC-PUBLIC@groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Wilson
Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 9:15 AM
To: AARC-PUBLIC@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AARC-PUBLIC] beginner question

Hi Jerry, and welcome to the group.

I own three handheld radios: a Yaesu FT60, a Baofeng UV-5R, and a Tytera MD-380. The Tytera operates on analog and DMR (digital mobile radio) in the
440 band. The Yaesu and Baofeng are analog-only FM dual-band (2-meter and 70-cm band.) I don't think a tri-bander (with 220 MHz) is really necessary as a first radio. The Yaesu was my first radio when I got into the hobby four years ago and it's given good reliable service. A handheld is a great way to get started. Handhelds transmitting 5W can hit all the local repeaters if you have decent line of sight.

The Baofengs have developed a bad rap, not the least of which was generated last summer by an FCC enforcement action against their importers. The Baofengs are easily modified to transmit (illegally) outside amateur frequencies. Of the two as a "Desert Island Radio," I'd definitely pick the Yaesu. It's very rugged and has much better battery life from the supplied battery pack. By comparison, the Baofeng's build quality is a little cheesy. But keep in mind it's also a $30 radio, and you tend to get what you pay for. With the either one, invest in a decent antenna. The "rubber duck" that's supplied with the Baofeng--throw it in the junk drawer, or use it to stir your coffee. That's about all it's good for.

With either radio, I'd strongly recommend picking up a programming cable in order to use CHIRP.
[https://chirp.danplanet.com/projects/chirp/wiki/Home] Programming either rig from the keypad is tedious, although the Yaesu keypad is a little friendlier. On the Baofeng you have to hunt through menus for *all *the settings, including squelch. The Yaesu has a squelch knob, which I much prefer, and you can access various features like "reverse" with one touch from the keypad. The Baofeng also emits a loud and annoying "pop" when the squelch opens.

These are just one user's opinion. Ask around.

Paul / KI4PW

On Mon, Feb 18, 2019 at 8:33 PM Jerry <jerry_foster1@...> wrote:

Hello all,
I initially sent this to the club’s general email account and Mike
Callaham, NW3V, suggested i submit to this group.

My son and I are studying for the Technician Class license exam and at
the same time are learning about and researching to buy our first radio.
Unfortunately I’ll be traveling for work this week and am not able to
attend the monthly meeting or I would introduce myself and ask in person.

I’m thinking of starting with a handheld transceiver and
adding/upgrading from there as we grow into it.

The Baofeng’s seem to get good reviews as an entry-level radio at an
affordable price.
I found one model (UV-5X3) that is a tri-band that includes the
220-225 MHz band.
From what I’ve read on-line, that band has been less-used in the past
but I don’t know if that has changed.

so my questions are:
1. Should I look only at radios that include the 220-225MHz band? is
this an important feature for a first radio?
2. Do you have any concerns about starting with a handheld?
3. Do you have any comments or concerns about Baofeng’s in general?
Until I saw the UV-5X3 I was looking at the UV-82HP or the BF-F8HP
(though the lower speaker power has me leaning towards the UV-82HP).

thank you for your time,
Jerry Foster



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